FAQ

 1. What is HomeSchoolLegal.com?
 2. What led you to offer this service?
 3. How can our family comply with homeschool regulations in our state?
 4. Who decides if our family is in compliance?
 5. So, if I take the steps in the Workbook, will that guarantee that our family’s homeschool will be in compliance with homeschool refulations in our state?
 6. Withdrawal letters - if a family has children enrolled in public school, is the family required by law to send a letter of withdrawal to the school, before homeschooling?
 7. Do you have a religious or political affiliation?

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1. What is HomeSchoolLegal.com?
HomeSchoolLegal.com is one aspect of the world-wide homeschooling portal of services located at www.Home-School-Inc.com.

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2. What led you to offer this service?
We saw a real need in the homeschool community for straightforward information on how to comply with state regulations. Although laws can sometimes be confusing, there is no reason for them to be mysterious. Toward that end, we offer two levels of service at www.HomeSchoolLegal.com. First, our detailed summaries of state laws are provided here to you free of charge. Second, we are creating State Workbooks for purchase which take families through the process of compliance, step-by-step, including Facts & Forms and checklists and worksheets, to help families homeschool with integrity and peace of mind.  

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3. How can our family comply with homeschool regulations in our state?
The steps are:

 - Read what the regulations are and what they require.
 - Decide which steps apply to you.
 - Take those steps.

At HomeSchoolLegal.com in our State Workbooks we provide you with the results of our research plus our extensive and uniquely helpful presentation of what the regulations require, the steps for compliance, plus information about standardized testing, and more.

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4. Who decides if our family is in compliance?
Elected officials write the homeschool laws. In most states, the organizations that enforce the laws are each state’s department of education and local superintendents in local school districts.
     Let’s think about homeschool requirements similarly to how we understand requirements made by the Internal Revenue Code and administered through the Internal Revenue Service. The IRS does not guarantee to us that we have done everything correctly. They just receive our tax returns and our taxes. They have people who check our reporting and, as a result, some people get audited. However, we can know that we file our tax returns and pay our taxes in good faith.
     When we submit required homeschooling information to a governing authority, we have done our part to comply. Yet, there are no guarantees that a school superintendent or a truant officer isn’t going to get a notion in their head that homeschooling isn’t good and decide to challenge it. But it is incumbent on us to do our part to keep them from our door, just as we keep the IRS auditor away from our house by not allowing red flags to populate our tax returns.
     A good faith step is to comply with the regulations in good faith. What we provide here are good faith summaries of homeschool requirements and good faith steps that families can take to comply. 

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5. So, if I take the steps in the Workbook, will that guarantee that our family’s homeschool will be in compliance with homeschool refulations in our state?
We would hope so, but we cannot guarantee this. The homeschool law in each state is interpreted by “regulators” in each state, and sometimes by the courts in each state. In this year alone, a California Appellate Court issued an opinion that shook that community to its foundation. The ramifications of this case are still being debated, but point to the principle that homeschooling is subject to challenge. By doing your best to comply with the law, you stand a better chance of not becoming the subject of a homeschooling test case and you help protect the whole community by not drawing a challenge to our Community’s broader right to home educate.

In our State Workbooks, our forms and information were designed to help homeschooling families:

a. See and understand homeschooling regulations and the requirements; and
b. Take the steps that lead to compliance with those regulations.

Only a regulatory agency itself can tell an individual family if that family is in compliance, from their perspective.  It is extremely rare for a family to receive a challenge from an agency, and as we have said, good faith compliance is a good way to prevent a challenge.  But if that were to happen, seek competent legal counsel for your family’s specific situation. What we offer does not constitute legal advice to individual families about whether or not they are in compliance. What we provide is educational information about legal compliance for families who homeschool, and for those who would like to.
 

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6. What about withdrawal letters? If a family has children enrolled in public school, is the family required by law to send a letter of withdrawal to the school, before homeschooling?
In most states such a letter is not required by law. But sending a courtesy letter of withdrawal to your child’s school can be a wise idea, especially if you will start homeschooling in the middle of the year, or any time after school begins. Some states require a letter of intent to be sent to the superintendent of the district, which is different than a withdrawal letter. Yet, even then sometimes that letter of intent is not communicated within the district to the school. A letter of withdrawal may prevent the school from expressing concern either to the family, or to the district, when a student stops attending. The potential benefit of sending such a withdrawal letter depends on your family’s specific situation.

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7. Do you have a religious or political affiliation?
Visitors to www.Home-School-Inc.com and www.HomeSchoolLegal.com and affiliated sites come from all over the United States, and the world, and hold a variety of beliefs. We seek to assist them all and will never prefer the agenda of one group of homeschoolers over another. We share a common passion: educating our children with freedom and integrity. We view that as an inclusive concept, not an excluding one.

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This is not intended to be legal advice and is offered only as an educational service for visitors to www.Home-School-Inc.com and www.HomeSchoolLegal.com. It is not a substitute for competent legal advice. Requirements may change at any time, and interpretations of the law and regulations can differ. Consult a legal services provider and a local homeschooling support group for more specific information.